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Faculty Q&A with Math Teacher Kate Bendrick

Sitting down at our cozy table in a Japanese restaurant near the school, I knew Kate was from Connecticut, so I started there.  I asked her if she grew up in an urban corner of New England, or somewhere more rural. 

“The ‘burbs,” she responded, “It was the worst of both worlds – remote enough to not have activities and social actions, but not remote enough to have peace of nature.”

“So, you like nature?” I ask.

“Not particularly.  It’s just the only up-side I can see.  No, I’m a city girl.”

“So you like it here in New York?”

Helpful Hints for Speaking with Teachers

I’ve been an educator for 13 years, and have been asked by numerous friends how to deal with a conflict that crops up in their child’s school.  Students come home at the end of the day filled with social and academic stress.  With growing classroom sizes and increasing curriculum demands in many schools, teachers are less likely to be able to stay in constant contact with parents about what happens while their children are at school.

Faculty Q&A with History Teacher Ian Rusten

Growing up in the artsy neighborhood of Soho, it is no surprise that Ian Rusten set his sights on a career in the arts. While he enjoyed subjects such as history and English, “I liked drawing even more,” he says. However, after teaching English in Korea after college, he caught the teaching bug and went on to earn an M.A. in Education and an M.A. in History, both at Hunter College.

“It’s funny; teaching as a career just never really occurred to me,” he says.

His students are glad that it finally did.

 

Mentoring: The Added Benefit of a Small School

As a child of educators and as an educator myself, I’ve always had an interest in the topic of education.  Even before I became an administrator, I would read any article or snippet about teaching that caught my eye.  Recently, the subject of teens and mentoring seemed to be popping up everywhere I looked.  From a study done by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health  to a

Faculty Q&A with Visual Technology Teacher Cavin Thuring

Growing up in New York City, Cavin Thuring had always been proficient at math and physics and entered college planning to major in either—or both. After arriving at college, however, he changed course, setting his sights on a degree in linguistics, though eventually came to the realization that the life of a linguistics professor was not for him. He finally decided he wanted to major in art (at the time he was two courses shy of a B.S. in Mathematics and 4 courses of a B.S. in Linguistics).

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